Tuesday’s Word

Epiphany
noun

1. ( initial capital letter ) a Christian festival, observed on January 6, commemorating the manifestation of Christ to the gentiles in the persons of the Magi; Twelfth-day.

2. an appearance or manifestation, especially of a deity.

3. a sudden, intuitive perception of or insight into the reality or essential meaning of something, usually initiated by some simple, homely, or commonplace occurrence or experience.

4. a literary work or section of a work presenting, usually symbolically, such a moment of revelation and insight.

Pasted from <http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/Epiphany?r=66>

I use this word casually all the time in conversation–“I was reading this book on marriage and had an epiohany.”  I use it in my writing too, especially when a character makes a life-altering realization.  But I read it recently in its capital-letter form in a historical romance (Sins of the Highlander by Cannie Mason with Mia Marlowe) referring to the 12th day after Christmas and was reminded that it has other meanings, especially relating to religious culture.

I think it would also make a pretty name for a character.  I might just have to use it sometime when it seems to fit a story.

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About Jessi Gage

Jessi lives with her husband and children in the Seattle area. She’s a passionate reader of all genres of romance, especially anything involving the paranormal. Ghosts, demons, vampires, witches, weres, faeries...you name it, she’ll read it. As for writing, she's sticking to Highlanders and contemporaries with a paranormal twist (for now). A career student (aka indecisive and inquisitive bookworm), Jessi brings her love of research to her worlds and characters. Her guiding tenet in her writing is that good always trumps evil, but not before evil gives good one heck of a run for its money. The last time she imagined a world without romance novels, her husband found her crouched in the corner, rocking.
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