Daisy Blanket Reconstruction

Thank you Lisa Tomassetti for posting this picture on the Crochet Crowd Stitch Social on FB last week!

Greeting, Crochet-Luvin’ Friends!

Last week, on one of the crochet groups I belong to on Facebook, The Crochet Crowd Stitch Social, a friend named Lisa posted a picture of a blanket she saw online to which she was unable to find the pattern. She asked if anyone wanted to help her deconstruct it so she could crochet her own version.

Naturally, I chose to spend a couple days on this rather than write, because, you know, procrastination. This is what I came up with. Enjoy!

First of all, I learned the blanket is worked in filet crochet. I wasn’t familiar with filet crochet, so I did my homework.

Basically, filet crochet is worked in blocks of three or four stitches (3DC or 4DC filet). Ideally, a block is as tall as it is wide. This creates a square within which you can create beautiful images and patterns that have a lacy feel. It is often worked with thread.

Diretions for filet crochet are often provided in a chart with black boxes representing “blocks” and white boxes representing open mesh.

If you’ve never done, filet crochet, take a look at these instructional posts before moving on:

https://stitchesnscraps.com/tutorial-basic-filet-crochet/

Tips and Tricks for beautiful filet crochet:

https://www.interweave.com/article/crochet/7-tips-filet-crochet/

Most important tips I took away from the above post:

1. Extended dc makes for a better, more square look than regular dc. Regular dc makes a kind of squat looking square. An extended dc gives you a stich height somewhere between a dc and a tc (US terminology).

borrowed from https://www.interweave.com/article/crochet/7-tips-filet-crochet/

To work extended dc: Yarn over, insert your hook in the indicated stitch, yarn over, pull up a loop, yarn over, and draw through 1 loop on your hook (yarn over, draw through 2 loops) 2 times.

2. Blocking is very important with filet crochet. It smooths the bumps in the stitches and makes the pattern pop:

borrowed from https://www.interweave.com/article/crochet/7-tips-filet-crochet/

Here is another helpful post. It has a tutorial on 3DC filet, which is what I think the “Daisy Blanket” pattern is based on (as opposed to 4DC filet, the other common type:

https://crochetistheway.blogspot.com/2014/04/how-to-3-dc-filet-crochet.html

Now that you’re a pro at filet crochet, here’s my attempt at recreating the Daisy Blanket pattern.

Recreated Pattern

I worked on recreating the body stitch first. The border patterns are at the end.

Well, here’s my attempt at recreating the pattern in the “Daisy Blanket.” How did I do?

Here’s a picture of the swatch on its own:

Notes:

This is my best guess in replicating the stitch seen in the blanket photo. My guess is the blanket was worked on smaller yarn and hook size than I used, since mine looks chunkier. But I think I managed to capture the spirit of the stitch.

The pattern is worked over 4 rows.

The swatch in the image was worked with Paintbox cotton yarn in peach orange and a size 3mm hook. This is 1 to 1.5 mm smaller than the recommended hook size.

The type of crochet is 3dc filet.

The pattern below uses US terminology.

Hook size, tension, and blocking are all very important for this stitch (as for any filet project). You may want to create a few swatches trying different yarns and hook sizes to see which looks best for your project.

Your stitches will look much neater after careful blocking, so don’t be discouraged if your work doesn’t look quite right as you get going.

Hook size 3mm unblocked on left, blocked on right

When in doubt, go with a smaller hook size. The tighter your stithes, the neater your work will look. The above swatch was worked on a 3mm hook. The swatch below was worked on a 3.5 mm hook. The pattern gets lost and doesn’t “pop” with the larger hook size.

Hook size 3.5mm unblocked on left, blocked on right

One of the stitches in my pattern is a monster of a stitch. If you want a simplified version of the pattern, I worked a swatch and provided directions below (see VariationDirections).

Personally, I prefer th simpler version shown above. The open diamonds make for a lacier look than the diamonds filled with a picot. The variation is also less of a yarn eater.

Are you ready to get hooking?

Stitches Used:

Edc = extended double crochet

The edc is a slightly taller version of the standard dc. It’s height will be between that of a dc & tc.

To work, yarn over, insert your hook in the indicated stitch, yarn over, pull up a loop, yarn over, and draw through 1 loop on your hook (yarn over, draw through 2 loops) 2 times.

2edctog decrease = 2 edc together worked in a decrease over the ch3-picot-ch3 in row 1

This is a monster stitch. Buckle up. Here we go.

To work, yo, insert hook into same st previously worked, as you would for a v-st

Pull up loop, yo, pull through 1 loop

Yo, pull through 2 loops. You have 2 loops on hook.

Insert hook through the top stitch of the pico (either 3rd or 4th st depending on how tightly you chained your pico). You now have 2 loops and the pico on your hook.

Yo, insert hook into next edc from previous row, pull up loop, yo, pull through 1 loop

Yo, pull through 2 loops. You now have on your hook, loop, pico, loop, loop.

Yo, pull through all loops/pico on hook.

Directions:

Chain 34

Row 1: Edc in 5th chain from hook, *ch3, sk1, sc, (chain 6, slip st into base of sc to form 6-st picot), ch3, sk1, 5 edc* Repeat from * to last 5 st, In last 5 stitches, ch3, sk1, sc, 6-st pico, ch3, sk1, edc, edc in last st, turn.

Row 2: Ch3 (counts as first edc), edc, *ch1, work 2edctog decrease (see stitch guide), ch1, ecd in same st (1st of 5 edcs from row 1), 4 edc * Repeat from * to end, omitting last 4 edc and instead working a single edc into turning chain, turn.

Row 3: Ch3, (counts as edc), *edc, edc in ch1 space, edc in the top of the 2edctog decrease from previous row (optional, before inserting hook to work this edc, dip the hook through the bar and then into the indicated stitch, work the stitch as normal. This creates a nicer looking back of the work for a more reversible fabric), edc into ch1 space, edc, ch3, sk1, sc, (chain 6, slip st into base of sc to form 6-st picot), ch3, sk1* Repeat from * until last st, work edc in turning chain, turn.

Row 4: Ch3, 5edc, *ch1, work 2edctog decrease, ch1, ecd in same st (1st of 5 edcs from row 1), 4 edc * Repeat from * until last st, work edc in turning chain, turn.

Row 5: Ch3 (counts as first edc), edc, *ch3, sk1, sc, (chain 6, slip st into base of sc to form 6-st picot), ch3, sk1, edc, edc in ch1 space, edc in the top of the 2edctog decrease from previous row (optional, before inserting hook to work this edc, dip the hook through the bar), edc into ch1 space, edc* Repeat from * until last st, work edc in turning chain, turn.

Repeat rows 2-5 until work reaches desired length.

(Please forgive typos/errors. I am not a professional pattern writer.)

Variation Directions:

Note: I worked the variation in a thicker yarn, Loops and Threads Impeccable with a size 4.5 hook. I wanted to see how the pattern looked on a larger scale. If I made this blanket, I would probably use a thicker yarn so I could get a larger blanket for the same number of stitches. Going up in size of yarn & hook in filet crochet is called “Exploding” the pattern.

Personally, I prefer the variation over the original stitch. I feel like the open diamonds create a lacier look, and the pattern requires less yarn because you’re omitting the 6-st pico.

Variation Pattern for Daisy Blanket. There are no picos inside the diamonds.
Notice how you can get a larger block of fabric using the same number of stitches when you use larger hook/yarn.

To work:

Chain 34

Row 1: Edc in 5th chain from hook, *ch3, sk1, sc, ch3, sk1, 5 edc* Repeat from * to 5 st from end. In last 5 stitches, ch3, sk1, sc, ch3, sk1, edc, edc in last chain, turn.

Row 2: Ch3 (counts as first edc), edc, *ch1, work 2edctog decrease (see stitch guide & omit the part involving the pico), ch1, ecd in same st (1st of 5 edcs from row 1), 4 edc * Repeat from * to end, omitting last 4 edc and instead working a single edc into turning chain, turn.

Row 3: Ch3, (counts as edc), *edc, edc in ch1 space, edc in the top of the 2edctog decrease from previous row, edc into ch1 space, edc, ch3, sk1, sc, ch3, sk1* Repeat from * until last st, work edc in turning chain, turn.

Row 4: Ch3, 5edc, *ch1, work 2edctog decrease, ch1, ecd in same st (1st of 5 edcs from row 1), 4 edc * Repeat from * until last st, work edc in turning chain, turn.

Row 5: Ch3 (counts as first edc), edc, *ch3, sk1, sc, ch3, sk1, edc, edc in ch1 space, edc in the top of the 2edctog decrease from previous row, edc into ch1 space, edc* Repeat from * until last st, work edc in turning chain, turn.

Repeat rows 2-5 until work reaches desired length.

Border Directions

The border is worked in 3 parts.

Part one is a sc all the way around the swatch, then a *dc, ch1, sk1* mesh-like stitch all the way around (make sure to work extra stitches in at the corners). Work regular dcs for the border, not edcs.

Part 2 (part with applique daisies) is linen st, which is worked over 2 rows. Row 1: *sc, ch1, sk1* all the way around. Row 2, work *sc, ch1, sk1* but work the scs into the chain-1 spaces from row 1. Work the linen stitch around as many times as you want. In the picture, it looks like it was worked over 12 to 14 rows.

Part 3 is a lacy border, which I didn’t try to recreate. You can do a search online for lacy blanket borders and pick one you like.

Thank you for reading! Let me know what you think of my recreation!

If you appreciate this post, take a look at my books. Don’t feel pressured to buy unless something really appeals to you!

About Jessi Gage

USA Today Bestselling Author Jessi Gage is addicted to happy-ever-after endings. She counts herself blessed because she gets to live her own HEA with her husband and children in the Seattle area. Jessi has the attention span of a gnat…unless there is a romance novel in her hands. In that case, you might need a bullhorn to get her to notice you. She writes what she loves to read: stories about love. Leave a comment to introduce yourself! There is no better motivation to finish her latest writing project than a note from a happy reader! Don't forget to sign up for Jessi’s newsletter so you’ll never miss a new release. Thanks for visiting!
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